[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.197.142.219. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
August 7, 1987

Physicians' Obligations in Radiation Issues

Author Affiliations

From the Division of Nuclear Medicine, University of Minnesota Hospital and Clinics, Minneapolis.

From the Division of Nuclear Medicine, University of Minnesota Hospital and Clinics, Minneapolis.

JAMA. 1987;258(5):673-676. doi:10.1001/jama.1987.03400050115039
Abstract

EVERYONE has inborn fears of the unknown, and, to many, one of these unknowns is ionizing radiation. Thus, radiation issues continue to be a matter of great public concern. In this context we, as physicians, have responsibilities in radiation matters to protect, insofar as possible, the physical and emotional health of our patients by preventing and/or minimizing the illnesses and injury that might be caused by radiation. To accomplish this goal, certain basic concepts need to be understood (Table 1). These concepts serve as the basis of this presentation. They have been considered in detail in various publications1-13 and can only be highlighted here.

Sources of Radiation Exposure  Ionizing radiations used in the practice of medicine come from radioactive materials and from x-ray machines. Radiation to which we are exposed also comes from natural sources, such as cosmic radiation and radioactivity in building materials and soil. On the average,

×