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Article
August 14, 1987

Male-to-Female Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus

Author Affiliations

From the School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley (Drs Padian and Winkelstein and Ms Marquis); the California Department of Health Services, Berkeley-Sacramento (Drs Francis and Anderson); and the Department of Public Health, City and County of San Francisco (Dr Rutherford and Mr O'Malley).

From the School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley (Drs Padian and Winkelstein and Ms Marquis); the California Department of Health Services, Berkeley-Sacramento (Drs Francis and Anderson); and the Department of Public Health, City and County of San Francisco (Dr Rutherford and Mr O'Malley).

JAMA. 1987;258(6):788-790. doi:10.1001/jama.1987.03400060064030
Abstract

Ninety-seven female sexual partners of 93 men infected with human Immunodeficiency virus were studied. All of the women had sexual contact within the year before their partner had been diagnosed as having acquired Immunodeficiency syndrome or was found to have a positive reaction on the human immunodeficiency virus serologic test. Fifty-seven percent were the partners of bisexual men. Overall, 23% of the women were infected (95% confidence interval, 15% to 32%). The total number of exposures to the index case (sexual contacts with ejaculation) and the specific practice of anal intercourse, also with the infected partner, were associated with transmission. Neither condom use, total number of sexual partners since 1978, nor lifetime number of sexually transmitted diseases was associated with infection.

(JAMA 1987;258:788-790)

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