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Article
February 19, 1982

Dissemination of Information on Hypertension-Reply

Author Affiliations

University of Michigan Medical School Ann Arbor

JAMA. 1982;247(7):977. doi:10.1001/jama.1982.03320320017011

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Abstract

In Reply.—  The major thrust of our article was to demonstrate when dissemination of information occurs and via what vehicles. I concur with Dr Gilchrist's concern with making statistical comparisons between two groups that vary in more than one characteristic, but I believe that the text that explains Table 2 notes the time interval differences and states that the statistical difference is "less meaningful." The study was not designed to point out differences between family physicians and internists but to study the dissemination of an important project.The fact that 40% of physicians surveyed at two months and 60% surveyed at six months were aware of the HDFP study is a remarkable accomplishment in light of previous research on information dissemination. The role of the medical journal and formal continuing medical education courses in disseminating information in a timely fashion is also helpful when you realize that these modalities constitute

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