[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.147.238.168. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
January 11, 1980

Detection of Phenylketonuria in Autistic and Psychotic Children

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Psychiatry (Drs Lowe, Young, and Cohen); the Department of Pediatrics (Drs Lowe, Seashore, Young, and Cohen); the Department of Human Genetics (Drs Tanaka and Seashore); and the Department of Psychology (Dr Cohen), Yale University School of Medicine, and the Child Study Center, New Haven, Conn.

JAMA. 1980;243(2):126-128. doi:10.1001/jama.1980.03300280024022
Abstract

Sixty-five children with pervasive developmental disturbance (autism and atypical childhood psychosis) were screened by standard urinary amino acid detection testing methods. Three of the children showed abnormalities in these screening tests, leading to the diagnosis of phenylketonuria. This was verified by repeated urinary testing and blood phenylalanine determinations. The children with phenylketonuria were treated with low-phenylalanine diets and have shown improvement in functioning and developmental level since treatment. Urinary genetic screening should be a standard test for all children being evaluated for serious developmental disturbances of childhood.

(JAMA 243:126-128, 1980)

×