January 18, 1980

Nuclear Cardiology: Clinical Applications

Author Affiliations

Veterans Administration Hines, III Abraham Lincoln School of Medicine University of Illinois College of Medicine Chicago


by Elias H. Botvinick and David M. Shames, 255 pp, with illus, $23, Baltimore, Williams & Wilkins Co, 1979.

JAMA. 1980;243(3):271. doi:10.1001/jama.1980.03300290051031

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.


In its evolution from a solely clinical skill, diagnostic cardiology has come to include many technical modalities. The development of general and specific noninvasive techniques has brought the chest roentgenogram, ECG, phonocardiography, blood tests (particularly enzyme levels), and more recently, ultrasound, while the development of invasive catheterization studies has supplied the clinician with highly resolved anatomic definition of the coronary arteries.

This volume is one of several recent books concerned with the use of nuclear-medicine imaging techniques for the diagnosis of cardiac disease by noninvasive means. It is unique, as the authors have demonstrated consummate skill in selecting and presenting those procedures that have the most current diagnostic relevance. This very skill in selectivity will, however, limit the useful life of the book. The phenomenal growth of nuclear cardiology will continue to deal with similar problems in cardiology, but continuing sophistication of technology will result in probable rapid obsolescence of