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Article
October 2, 1987

STDs, IVF, and Barrier Contraception

Author Affiliations

Family Health International Research Triangle Park, NC
University of Southern California School of Medicine Los Angeles

Family Health International Research Triangle Park, NC
University of Southern California School of Medicine Los Angeles

JAMA. 1987;258(13):1729. doi:10.1001/jama.1987.03400130043012
Abstract

To the Editor.—  Worldwide, approximately 5000 children have been born as the result of in vitro fertilization (IVF). In the United States alone, there are about 1 million cases of pelvic inflammatory disease each year. If we assume that 130 000 to 500 000 of these cases lead to tubal occlusion,1 then in the United States alone in one month or less, pelvic inflammatory disease creates more new cases of infertility than have been successfully treated by all IVF programs in the world since Louise Brown was born in 1978. Recently, it has been demonstrated that use of condoms and spermicides reduces the risk of acquiring chlamydial infections and other sexually transmitted diseases and reduces the risk of infertility.2,3 In a relatively short span of time, the active promotion of the use of condoms and spermicides to those at risk of tubal disease could prevent more cases of infertility than IVF

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