[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.197.142.219. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
November 6, 1987

Leisure-Time Physical Activity Levels and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease and DeathThe Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial

Author Affiliations

From the Division of Epidemiology (Drs Leon, Jacobs, and Rauramaa) and Biometry (Dr Connett), School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. Dr Rauramaa is currently with the Kuopio Research Institute of Exercise Medicine, Kuopio, Finland.

From the Division of Epidemiology (Drs Leon, Jacobs, and Rauramaa) and Biometry (Dr Connett), School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. Dr Rauramaa is currently with the Kuopio Research Institute of Exercise Medicine, Kuopio, Finland.

JAMA. 1987;258(17):2388-2395. doi:10.1001/jama.1987.03400170074026
Abstract

The relation of self-selected leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) to first major coronary heart disease (CHD) events and overall mortality was studied in 12 138 middle-aged men participating in the Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial. Total LTPA over the preceding year was quantitated in mean minutes per day at baseline by questionnaire, with subjects classified into tertiles (low, moderate, and high) based on LTPA distribution. During seven years of follow-up, moderate LTPA was associated with 63% as many fatal CHD events and sudden deaths, and 70% as many total deaths as low LTPA (P<.01). Mortality rates with high LTPA were similar to those in moderate LTPA; however, combined fatal and nonfatal major CHD events were 20% lower with high as compared with low LTPA (P<.05). These risk differentials persisted after statistical adjustments for possible confounding variables, including other baseline risk factors and Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial group assignments. It is concluded that LTPA has a modest inverse relation to CHD and overall mortality in middle-aged men at high risk for CHD.

(JAMA 1987;258:2388-2395)

×