[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
November 6, 1987

Acquired Immunodeficiency SyndromeState Legislative Activity

Author Affiliations

From the Department of State Legislation, Division of Legislative Activities, American Medical Association, Chicago.

From the Department of State Legislation, Division of Legislative Activities, American Medical Association, Chicago.

JAMA. 1987;258(17):2410-2414. doi:10.1001/jama.1987.03400170096030
Abstract

MORE than 450 bills have been introduced in state legislatures in 1987, on the subject of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). This flurry of legislative activity reflects the serious public health concern raised by this disease in every part of the country (see "References").

State statutes relating to the subject of AIDS were first enacted in 1983. Most of the early laws created statewide task forces to inform and educate the public. Since that time, statutes have been enacted on a wide variety of AIDS-related topics. The information included herein based on a review through Oct 6, 1987, focus on ten major subject areas that have become matters of state law (Table). The categories highlighted, as well as examples of states that have enacted laws on each of these issues, are (1) antibody testing, (2) blood and blood products, (3) confidentiality, (4) employment, (5) housing, (6) informed consent, (7) insurance, (8)

×