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Article
March 21, 1980

Cortical Blindness in Puerperium

Author Affiliations

Metropolitan Hospital Center New York

JAMA. 1980;243(11):1134. doi:10.1001/jama.1980.03300370014014
Abstract

To the Editor.—  Cortical blindness is most frequently caused by occlusive vascular disease involving both occipital lobes. Two patients had cortical blindness during the puerperium.

Report of Cases.—Case 1.—  A 34-year-old primigravida had headache, vomiting, and loss of vision on the fourth day following cesarean section. The pupils were equal and reacted to light; fundi were normal, but optokinetic nystagmus was absent. On the sixth day, blindness persisted, and she had a focal motor and a generalized seizure. Her blood pressure was 210/120 mm Hg, and urine showed 3+ proteinuria.The next day, she could read but experienced well-formed visual hallucinations. Optokinetic nystagmus was present. An EEG showed absence of alpha activity and bilateral bursts of high-amplitude, 2- to 3-Hz activity. On the eighth day, mild, right hemiparesis was noted. A radionuclide brain scan was normal. An EEG showed alpha activity and 4- to 6-Hz bilateral slowing. An

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