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Article
March 19, 1982

Kant, Sartre, and the Categorical Imperative

Author Affiliations

The Hahnemann Medical College Philadelphia

JAMA. 1982;247(11):1566. doi:10.1001/jama.1982.03320360018017

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Abstract

To the Editor.—  Sartre certainly "was onto [sic] something when he said that each of us should make decisions about conduct as if our every act were irretrievably binding on mankind": the shoulders of Kant.The categorical imperative admonishes one to act so that one's every act shall be a universal law.Kant was on to something, too. In his fundamental principles of the metaphysics of ethics, he was only restating an age-old ethical principle.

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