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Article
December 25, 1987

A Physician's Guide to Adoption

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospital of Jacksonville (Fla) (Dr A. M. Kaunitz); the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles (Dr Grimes); and the Department of Legal Affairs, Methodist Hospital, Inc, Jacksonville, Fla (Ms K. K. Kaunitz).

From the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospital of Jacksonville (Fla) (Dr A. M. Kaunitz); the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles (Dr Grimes); and the Department of Legal Affairs, Methodist Hospital, Inc, Jacksonville, Fla (Ms K. K. Kaunitz).

JAMA. 1987;258(24):3537-3541. doi:10.1001/jama.1987.03400240069026
Abstract

The growing number of couples seeking to adopt may have outstripped the number of babies in the United States available for adoption. Although increased availability and use of abortion have resulted in fewer single women continuing their pregnancies, the increased tendency of unmarried mothers to raise rather than relinquish their children has, in particular, limited the number of babies available for adoption. Despite the unpopularity of adoption among women with unintended pregnancies, addressing this option remains an important part of pregnancy counseling. Appropriate obstetric care of women placing their babies for adoption includes acknowledgment of the loss these women experience. Knowledge of adoption resources and willingness to discuss adoption can help physicians provide better care of unintentionally pregnant as well as infertile patients.

(JAMA 1987;258:3537-3541)

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