[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.166.89.187. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
January 8, 1988

Allergic Rhinitis

Author Affiliations

From the Division of Allergy and Immunology, St Louis University School of Medicine (Dr Druce), and the Allergic Disease Section, Laboratory of Clinical Investigation, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md (Dr Kaliner).

From the Division of Allergy and Immunology, St Louis University School of Medicine (Dr Druce), and the Allergic Disease Section, Laboratory of Clinical Investigation, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md (Dr Kaliner).

JAMA. 1988;259(2):260-263. doi:10.1001/jama.1988.03720020062038
Abstract

SELECTED CASE  A 28-YEAR-OLD medical resident presented to the allergy clinic with a two-year history of rhinorrhea, sneezing, and nasal obstruction. His symptoms were worse in the fall, and the nasal obstruction persisted intermittently throughout the winter. Four years previously he had moved to Washington, DC, from rural Oregon. On further questioning, the patient admitted to a decreased sense of smell and some wheezing on exertion. Over-the-counter therapy with various antihistamines and decongestants had produced initial relief, but this was not sustained.For editorial comment see p 267.The results of a physical examination were normal except for a finding of pale, boggy nasal turbinates. Topical nasal decongestion revealed the presence of bilateral nasal polyps. Skin tests were performed by the prick route to a battery of inhalant allergens. Significant positive results were obtained to ragweed, molds, house dust mites, and histamine control.The patient was prescribed a vigorous program

×