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Article
March 11, 1988

Instrumentation in Positron Emission Tomography

Author Affiliations

St Louis, Chairman; Durham, NC; Chicago, Resident Representative; Minneapolis; Los Angeles, Immediate Past Chairman; Syracuse, NY; Lubbock, Tex, Medical Student Representative; Tucson, Vice-Chairman; Chicago; Cleveland; New Orleans; Baltimore; Upton, NY; Los Angeles; Bethesda, Md; Los Angeles; Los Angeles; Baltimore (Council Liaison); Upton, NY
From the Council on Scientific Affairs, American Medical Association, Chicago.

St Louis, Chairman; Durham, NC; Chicago, Resident Representative; Minneapolis; Los Angeles, Immediate Past Chairman; Syracuse, NY; Lubbock, Tex, Medical Student Representative; Tucson, Vice-Chairman; Chicago; Cleveland; New Orleans; Baltimore; Upton, NY; Los Angeles; Bethesda, Md; Los Angeles; Los Angeles; Baltimore (Council Liaison); Upton, NY
From the Council on Scientific Affairs, American Medical Association, Chicago.

JAMA. 1988;259(10):1531-1536. doi:10.1001/jama.1988.03720100049037
Abstract

Positron emission tomography (PET) is a three-dimensional medical imaging technique that noninvasively measures the concentration of radiopharmaceuticals in the body that are labeled with positron emitters. With the proper compounds, PET can be used to measure metabolism, blood flow, or other physiological values in vivo. The technique is based on the physics of positron annihilation and detection and the mathematical formulations developed for x-ray computed tomography. Modern PET systems can provide three-dimensional images of the brain, the heart, and other internal organs with resolutions on the order of 4 to 6 mm. With the selectivity provided by a choice of injected compounds, PET has the power to provide unique diagnostic information that is not available with any other imaging modality. This is the first of five reports on the nature and uses of PET that have been prepared for the American Medical Association's Council on Scientific Affairs by an authoritative panel.

(JAMA 1988;259:1531-1536)

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