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Article
March 11, 1988

The Benefits and Risks of Exercise Training in Patients With Chronic Coronary Artery Disease

Author Affiliations

From the Divisions of Cardiology and Nutrition and Metabolism, The Miriam Hospital, Brown University Program in Medicine, Providence, RI.

From the Divisions of Cardiology and Nutrition and Metabolism, The Miriam Hospital, Brown University Program in Medicine, Providence, RI.

JAMA. 1988;259(10):1537-1540. doi:10.1001/jama.1988.03720100055038
Abstract

WILLIAM Heberden, in his Commentaries on the History and Cure of Diseases published in 1802, had "little or nothing to advance..." for the treatment of angina pectoris but did know of one patient "who set himself a task of sawing wood for half an hour every day and was nearly cured."1 Heberden's observation that physical training can nearly cure angina in some patients has been confirmed in recent studies,2-4 and physical training remains one of the most effective methods for improving the functional capacity and psychological well-being of selected patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). This article summarizes the effect of CAD on exercise tolerance and the benefits and risks of exercise training in patients with CAD.

ACUTE CARDIOVASCULAR RESPONSE TO EXERCISE 

Healthy Subjects  A brief review of the normal cardiovascular response to exercise is necessary to understand how CAD alters exercise performance. Functional capacity during dynamic exercise

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