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Article
May 6, 1988

Guidelines for Quality Assurance

Author Affiliations

Muskegon, Mich, Chairman; Rochester, NY; Oregon City; Los Altos, Calif; Redwood City, Calif; New York; Shelby, NC; Oklahoma City; La Crosse, Wis; Huntington, WVa; Rio Grande City, Tex; Boston; Chicago, Secretary
From the Council on Medical Service, American Medical Association, Chicago.

Muskegon, Mich, Chairman; Rochester, NY; Oregon City; Los Altos, Calif; Redwood City, Calif; New York; Shelby, NC; Oklahoma City; La Crosse, Wis; Huntington, WVa; Rio Grande City, Tex; Boston; Chicago, Secretary
From the Council on Medical Service, American Medical Association, Chicago.

JAMA. 1988;259(17):2572-2573. doi:10.1001/jama.1988.03720170048032
Abstract

AT THE 1986 Annual Meeting, the House of Delegates adopted Council on Medical Service Report A on "quality of care." That report identified eight essential elements that characterize care of high quality and presented a series of nine "Guidelines" for the conduct of quality assessment, the process by which the quality of medical care delivered is monitored and measured. At the 1987 Annual Meeting, the Council's Report A described the operation of five specific quality assessment systems that are under way or planned and discussed how specific features of these systems illustrated the quality assessment guidelines in an operational way.

A comprehensive program for managing the quality of care includes not only quality assessment but quality assurance activities, designed to assist practitioners in modifying practice behavior found to be deficient by quality assessment, to protect the public against incompetent practitioners, as well as to modify structural or resource deficiencies that

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