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Article
May 13, 1988

Fatal Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Patient With Lyme Disease

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Medicine, Montefiore Hospital, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine (Drs Kirsch, Ruben, Norden, and Winkelstein); and the Departments of Internal Medicine (Dr Steere) and Pathology (Dr Duray), Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Conn. Dr Steere is now with the Department of Medicine, Tufts—New England Medical Center, Boston. Dr Duray is now with the Department of Pathology, Fox Chase Cancer Institute, Philadelphia.

From the Department of Medicine, Montefiore Hospital, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine (Drs Kirsch, Ruben, Norden, and Winkelstein); and the Departments of Internal Medicine (Dr Steere) and Pathology (Dr Duray), Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Conn. Dr Steere is now with the Department of Medicine, Tufts—New England Medical Center, Boston. Dr Duray is now with the Department of Pathology, Fox Chase Cancer Institute, Philadelphia.

JAMA. 1988;259(18):2737-2739. doi:10.1001/jama.1988.03720180063034
Abstract

A dry cough, fever, generalized maculopapular rash, and myositis developed in a 67-year-old woman; she also had markedly abnormal liver function test results. Serologic tests proved that she had an infection of recent onset with Borrelia burgdorferi, the agent that causes Lyme disease. During a two-month course of illness, her condition remained refractory to treatment with antibiotics, salicylates, and steroids. Ultimately, fatal adult respiratory distress syndrome developed; this was believed to be secondary to Lyme disease.

(JAMA 1988;259:2737-2739)

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