[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
July 15, 1988

The Use of Extracorporeal Rewarming in a Child Submerged for 66 Minutes

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Pediatrics (Drs Bolte, Black, and Corneli) and the Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery (Mr Bowers and Dr Thorne), Primary Children's Medical Center, Salt Lake City.

From the Department of Pediatrics (Drs Bolte, Black, and Corneli) and the Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery (Mr Bowers and Dr Thorne), Primary Children's Medical Center, Salt Lake City.

JAMA. 1988;260(3):377-379. doi:10.1001/jama.1988.03410030093036
Abstract

A 2 1/2year-old girl had a good neurologic recovery after submersion in cold water for at least 66 minutes; as far as we know, this is the longest time ever reported. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was maintained for more than two hours before the initiation of extracorporeal rewarming in this child who had a core temperature of 19°C. To our knowledge, this is the first successful use of extracorporeal rewarming in a child suffering from accidental hypothermia. Extension of this technique to children offers rapid rewarming and cardiovascular support for pediatric victims of severe hypothermia. We emphasize the importance of a coordinated response by the entire emergency medical system integrated with hospital-based personnel. Where it is geographically feasible, regionalization of triage and care for the pediatric victim of severe accidental hypothermia should be considered.

(JAMA 1988;260:377-379)

×