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Article
August 5, 1988

Stability of Specialty Preferences Among Medical School Graduates-Reply

Author Affiliations

University of Vermont College of Medicine Burlington
American Medical Association Chicago
Association of American Medical Colleges Washington, DC

University of Vermont College of Medicine Burlington
American Medical Association Chicago
Association of American Medical Colleges Washington, DC

JAMA. 1988;260(5):639-640. doi:10.1001/jama.1988.03410050054026
Abstract

In Reply.—  Not all specialty options listed in the Graduation Questionnaire fit equally comfortably within primary care, specialty care, or supporting services, and we agree with Dr Petersdorf that the classification of internal medicine and pediatrics subspecialties within primary care may be unconventional. With these subspecialty branches not developing from the trunks of general medicine and general pediatrics until midresidency training, however, it seemed rational in this study of medical students to display the broad fields of internal medicine and pediatrics with their subspecialties. Another way to display these data would have been to place these subspecialties within a fourth category: medical specialties.The purpose of the study was to investigate stability and evolution of specialty preferences. The data were summarized separately for general and subspecialty internal medicine and for general and subspecialty pediatrics. It was therefore possible to analyze each of these groups individually. If one defines primary care

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