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Article
August 26, 1988

Undergraduate Medical Education

Author Affiliations

Dr Jonas is from the American Medical Association (AMA) Division of Undergraduate Medical Education, and Ms Etzel is from the AMA Office of Medical Education Information Analysis.

Dr Jonas is from the American Medical Association (AMA) Division of Undergraduate Medical Education, and Ms Etzel is from the AMA Office of Medical Education Information Analysis.

JAMA. 1988;260(8):1063-1071. doi:10.1001/jama.1988.03410080033005

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Abstract

INTRODUCTION  In a time of exploding scientific and technological information, which parallels a period of profound change in societal attitudes toward the delivery of health care, the challenge to medical educators and their institutions has never been greater.Undergraduate medical education is confronted by an expanded knowledge base in the biomedical sciences and pressures to adjust the curriculum accordingly. In addition, in attempting to respond to changing social currents, with ethical dilemmas assuming a new magnitude, a renewed focus has occurred in the development of a proper balance between the art and the science of medicine.The system of undergraduate medical education in the United States consists of medical schools with a diversity of missions. This diversity, combined with a variety of innovations in undergraduate medical education, represents the considerable strength of our system.This annual report on undergraduate medical education in the United States during the 1987-1988 academic year

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