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Article
September 16, 1988

Radiobiology for the Radiologist

Author Affiliations

Thomas Jefferson University Philadelphia

Thomas Jefferson University Philadelphia

 

by Eric J. Hall, ed 3; 535 pp, with 265 illus, $42.50, Philadelphia, JB Lippincott Co, 1988.

JAMA. 1988;260(11):1628-1629. doi:10.1001/jama.1988.03410110136047

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Abstract

"Doctor, if I have this mammogram you've recommended, what are my chances of getting cancer at a later date from the irradiation?" "What will the radiation from this CT scan do to my fetus in case I'm pregnant?" "I'm an operating room nurse of childbearing age. Will radiation from portable x-rays in the OR damage my ovaries?" "I've had radiations for cancer before. If I get these dental x-rays, will that increase the risk to me? Will the benefit be worth the risk?"

In the newest edition of what has become a classic radiation biology text, Dr Eric Hall devotes about one fourth of the total to the background data and literature that lets us answer such questions, questions that in the same or a similar form have been addressed to almost all physicians. This background is readable and presented in orderly fashion. He makes it, above all, encompassable in

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