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Article
October 21, 1988

Precautions Against Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection for Workers in Blood Donor Centers

Author Affiliations

Southwest Florida Blood Bank University of South Florida College of Medicine Tampa

Southwest Florida Blood Bank University of South Florida College of Medicine Tampa

JAMA. 1988;260(15):2215. doi:10.1001/jama.1988.03410150063015
Abstract

To the Editor.—  Ever since the transmissibility of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) through contact with body fluids raised concerns for the safety of health care workers, several recommendations for the prevention of human immunodeficiency virus transmission in health care settings have been issued by different groups and government agencies.1-3 In all of those statements, the setting contemplated is that of a patient with a diagnosis of AIDS being cared for at a hospital or that of a person in the high-risk behavioral group being admitted to a hospital for care.Unfortunately, those proper and carefully thought out recommendations for handling AIDS patients or their body fluids are being extrapolated to a totally different environment, the blood donor room. As a result, some volunteer blood collection agencies now require that phlebotomists wear gloves while collecting blood from volunteer donors. Currently, there is debate over whether recommendations or regulations requiring that

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