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Article
October 21, 1988

Peripheral Neuropathy in Two Workers Exposed to 1,1,1-Trichloroethane

Author Affiliations

Ontario Ministry of Labour Toronto

Ontario Ministry of Labour Toronto

JAMA. 1988;260(15):2217. doi:10.1001/jama.1988.03410150065022
Abstract

To the Editor.—  Two cases of peripheral neuropathy in workers exposed to the solvent 1,1,1-trichloroethane are reported. It was not possible, however, to link them causally with the exposure.Both women worked at degreasing motor end shields in a company that manufactures motors for appliances. This required repeated immersion of their hands into the solvent for several hours at a time.

Report of Cases.—  Case 1.—A 25-year-old woman presented to a neurologist in June 1980 with two months of numbness and disturbance of sensation in all limbs beginning three months after starting degreasing. She had worked for six years previously in other departments without problems. The neurologist found hypoactive reflexes and minimal blunting of sensation in the right hand. Nerve-conduction studies in 1980 revealed low median and ulnar sensory action potential amplitudes with normal distal sensory latency and motor conduction velocity; distal sensory latencies were found to be prolonged in

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