[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.205.87.3. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
June 15, 1994

Interim Guidelines for Management of Abnormal Cervical Cytology

Author Affiliations

From the Departments of Gynecology-Obstetrics and Pathology, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md (Dr Kurman); Early Detection Branch (Dr Henson) and Environmental Epidemiology Branch (Dr Schiffman), National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Md; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Chicago (Ill) School of Medicine (Dr Herbst); and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Massachusetts, Worcester (Dr Noller).
The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Md.; University of Rochester (NY) Medical School; University of Kansas, Lawrence; Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Mass; Memorial Hospital, New York, NY; Graduate Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa; University of Arizona, Tucson; National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Md; University of Chicago (Ill) School of Medicine; Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, DC; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Ga; Vanderbilt University Hospital, Nashville, Tenn; American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Washington, DC; Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Ga; Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY; Long Island Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park, NY; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Ga; Sacred Heart Hospital, Allentown, Pa; Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY; The Carson Center, Southfield, Mich; The Sloane Hospital for Women, New York, NY; National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Md; Graduate Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa; National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, Md; National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Md; Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio; SynchroCell, Silver Spring, Md; National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Md; American Society of Clinical Pathologists, Chicago, Ill; University of Minnesota School of Medicine, Minneapolis; University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville; American Society of Clinical Pathologists, Philadelphia, Pa; American Cancer Society, Miami, Fla; Society of Gynecologic Oncologists, Charleston, SC; American College of Physicians, Atlanta, Ga; American Academy of Family Practice, Houston, Tex; College of American Pathologists, Wichita, Kan; American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Worcester, Mass; Gynecologic Oncology Group, Philadelphia, Pa; American Society of Internal Medicine, Jefferson City, Mo.

JAMA. 1994;271(23):1866-1869. doi:10.1001/jama.1994.03510470070037
Abstract

THE INCIDENCE of and mortality from cervical cancer in the United States have decreased dramatically over the past 40 years, in part because of early diagnosis and treatment of cervical cancer precursor lesions. The success of cervical cytological screening has served as a model for early diagnosis of other types of cancer. Although numerous studies have shown that lack of cytological screening is a major risk factor for the development of invasive cervical cancer,1-3 it is important to emphasize that none of the screening, diagnostic, or therapeutic techniques used in medicine are perfect. Accordingly, a few women will develop cervical cancer despite adherence to accepted screening protocols. In addition, problems inherent with sampling, interpretation, and effective clinical follow-up preclude total prevention of cervical cancer.

In recent years it has become evident that the cost and morbidity associated with the detection and treatment of low-grade cervical lesions have escalated, probably

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×