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Article
November 18, 1988

Does Anesthesia Contribute to Operative Mortality?

Author Affiliations

From the Departments of Anesthesia and Community Health Sciences (Dr Cohen) and the Biostatistical Consuiting Unit (Mr Tate), University of Manitoba, Winnipeg; and the Department of Anesthesia, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Dr Duncan).

From the Departments of Anesthesia and Community Health Sciences (Dr Cohen) and the Biostatistical Consuiting Unit (Mr Tate), University of Manitoba, Winnipeg; and the Department of Anesthesia, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Dr Duncan).

JAMA. 1988;260(19):2859-2863. doi:10.1001/jama.1988.03410190107032
Abstract

An anesthesia follow-up program (100 000 anesthetics) and vital statistics data were used to assess the role of anesthesia in operative deaths. Four factor groups (patient, surgical, anesthesia, and "other") were assessed by logistic regression analysis to ascertain which variables were predictive of seven-day mortality. Advanced age, male gender, physical status, major surgery, emergency procedure, procedures performed in 1975 to 1979, intraoperative complications, narcotic techniques, and having one or two anesthetic drugs administered were associated with increased mortality, whereas duration of anesthesia, experience of the anesthesiologist, and inhalation techniques were not. Receiver-operator characteristic curves showed no increment in prediction of operative mortality greater than that for patient plus surgical factors when "other" or anesthetic factors were added. Patient and surgical risk factors were much more important in predicting seven-day mortality than the anesthesia factors we studied.

(JAMA 1988;260:2859-2863)

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