July 9, 1982

Surgical Infectious Diseases

Author Affiliations

University of Washington School of Medicine Seattle


edited by Richard L. Simmons and Richard J. Howard, 1,172 pp, with illus, $135, New York, Appleton-Century-Crofts, 1982.

JAMA. 1982;248(2):240-241. doi:10.1001/jama.1982.03330020076042

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Surgical Infections: Selective Antibiotic Therapy, edited by Robert E. Condon and Sherwood L. Gorbach, 180 pp, with illus, $29.95, Baltimore, Williams & Wilkins Co, 1981.

Two recent books are a welcome product of the increase in basic and clinical research in the area of surgical infectious diseases and of a growing degree of collaboration among specialists in this area. After early advances in the practice of asepsis and the basic principles of wound management, most surgeons, with some important exceptions, left research in basic mechanisms of infectious diseases to medical specialists. During several decades of antibiotic proliferation, much infectious disease research concentrated on antibiotic pharmacokinetics, mechanisms of action of antimicrobials, and the pathogenesis of systemic diseases caused by single microorganisms.

During this period, infectious disease specialists and surgeons have tended to become somewhat separated, each feeling, with some justification, that the other did not fully understand the complexities of his