[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
April 7, 1989

When It Comes to Child Care, Hospitals May Be Setting the Pace for Much of the Nation

Author Affiliations

man, JAMA Journalism Fellow, Medill School of Journalism, Northwestern University, Evanston, Ill

man, JAMA Journalism Fellow, Medill School of Journalism, Northwestern University, Evanston, Ill

JAMA. 1989;261(13):1857-1861. doi:10.1001/jama.1989.03420130015005

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

NEARLY TWO (37.9%) out of five hospitals surveyed provide, or help provide for, some kind of child care for their employees. And 38% of those that don't plan to establish such benefits before the end of this year.

That is the finding of the American College of Healthcare Executives, Chicago, Ill, and the American Association of Healthcare Consultants, Fairfax, Va. In contrast, the two organizations say, today only about 1 (11.1%) in 10 businesses provides such services for its employees.

Larger Hospitals Oversampled  The survey examined 965 hospitals throughout the United States. The hospitals were stratified by number of beds, and the two organizations concede that large hospitals were oversampled, since they seemed more likely to provide child-care services. Survey questions examined such aspects as types of child care benefits offered, types of hospitals involved, attitudes of hospital executives toward offering care, and financial contributions to child care.Currently, the

×