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Article
April 21, 1989

An Epidemiologic Study of Headache Among Adolescents and Young Adults

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Epidemiology (Drs Linet and Stewart and Ms Sprecher) and the Division of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education, Department of Health Policy and Management (Dr Celentano), The Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health, Baltimore, Md; the Department of Neurology, University of Kansas College of Health Sciences and Hospital, Kansas City (Dr Ziegler); and the Analytic Studies Section, Biostatistics Branch, Epidemiology and Biostatistics Program, Division of Cancer Etiology, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Md (Dr Linet).

From the Department of Epidemiology (Drs Linet and Stewart and Ms Sprecher) and the Division of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education, Department of Health Policy and Management (Dr Celentano), The Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health, Baltimore, Md; the Department of Neurology, University of Kansas College of Health Sciences and Hospital, Kansas City (Dr Ziegler); and the Analytic Studies Section, Biostatistics Branch, Epidemiology and Biostatistics Program, Division of Cancer Etiology, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Md (Dr Linet).

JAMA. 1989;261(15):2211-2216. doi:10.1001/jama.1989.03420150061038
Abstract

Despite extensive description of headache among patients in specialty clinics and general practices in the United States, there have been few community-wide investigations. In a population-based telephone interview study of 10 169 Washington County, Maryland, residents who were 12 through 29 years old, 57.1% of males and 76.5% of females reported that their most recent headache occurred within the previous 4 weeks. Four or more headaches in the preceding month were reported by 6.1% of males and 14.0% of females. The average duration of the subjects' most recent headache was 5.9 hours for males and 8.2 hours for females; 7.9% and 13.9%, respectively, missed part of a day or more of school or work because of that headache. Within the month before interview, 3.0% of males and 7.4% of females had suffered from a migraine headache. Consultations with a physician, by specialty, for headache-related problems are described by sex and age of subjects, as is the use of specific prescription and nonprescription medications.

(JAMA. 1989;261:2211-2216)

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