[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
May 5, 1989

Counseling and Antibody Testing to Prevent HIV Infection-Reply

Author Affiliations

New Mexico Health and Environment Department Santa Fe
University of New Mexico School of Law Albuquerque
Centers for Disease Control Atlanta, Ga
University of New Mexico School of Medicine Albuquerque

New Mexico Health and Environment Department Santa Fe
University of New Mexico School of Law Albuquerque
Centers for Disease Control Atlanta, Ga
University of New Mexico School of Medicine Albuquerque

JAMA. 1989;261(17):2502-2503. doi:10.1001/jama.1989.03420170043021
Abstract

In Reply. —  We wish to thank Ms Levine and Dr Nolan for their ethical review of our blinded study of persons who refused anonymous HIV testing. From the wording of their letter, we believe that blinded and anonymous testing need to be distinguished. In both procedures, identifying information is removed from the specimen and the test result cannot be linked with an individual by the testing source. In anonymous testing, a client electing to be tested is given a unique number by which he or she alone can access the results. In blinded testing, blood taken for other purposes is tested and results are linked only to demographic information about the client. Blinded testing is permitted under federal regulations governing protection of human subjects.1 With either procedure, it would not be possible to inform a person, such as a military commander, of anyone's HIV status.We disagree with

×