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Article
June 2, 1989

Current Concepts in Brain Resuscitation

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Md.

From the Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Md.

JAMA. 1989;261(21):3143-3147. doi:10.1001/jama.1989.03420210091022
Abstract

WHILE the initial impetus for intensive care 20 years ago grew out of major advances in cardiac and pulmonary care, the last decade has seen a tremendous interest in neurological intensive care. Several factors have combined to stimulate this interest. First, as intensivists provided better care to sicker patients with cardiac and pulmonary disease, critically ill patients survived more often and a review of their longterm complications noted a significant frequency of neurological problems. Next, as an outgrowth of the Vietnam War, techniques for rapid evacuation of casualties were used to improve treatment for traffic accident victims in the United States. The result was large numbers of hospitalized patients with head injury. Neurosurgical techniques designed to treat head-injured patients, including intracranial pressure monitoring, became commonplace in tertiary care hospitals. Pharmacologic and physiological treatment for cerebral edema, developed for patients with head injury, was used in medical patients with conditions ranging

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