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Article
June 16, 1989

Cholesterol-Lowering Effects of Psyllium Hydrophilic MucilloidAdjunct Therapy to a Prudent Diet for Patients With Mild to Moderate Hypercholesterolemia

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota (Drs Bell and Hunninghake and Mss Hectorne and Reynolds), and the Department of Medicine, Hennepin County Medical Center (Dr Bell), Minneapolis; and Health and Personal Care Division, the Procter and Gamble Co, Cincinnati, Ohio (Mr Balm).

From the Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota (Drs Bell and Hunninghake and Mss Hectorne and Reynolds), and the Department of Medicine, Hennepin County Medical Center (Dr Bell), Minneapolis; and Health and Personal Care Division, the Procter and Gamble Co, Cincinnati, Ohio (Mr Balm).

JAMA. 1989;261(23):3419-3423. doi:10.1001/jama.1989.03420230073029
Abstract

Psyllium hydrophilic mucilloid was examined for its ability to lower serum cholesterol levels in hypercholesterolemic patients. Seventy-five patients with mild to moderate hypercholesterolemia were evaluated in this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled parallel study. Patients were treated with a Step I diet for 12 weeks before receiving placebo or 3.4 g of psyllium (equivalent to 1 teaspoon) three times per day for 8 weeks. Compared with placebo, psyllium achieved an additional 4.8% reduction in total cholesterol level, 8.2% reduction in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level, and 8.8% reduction in apolipoprotein B level. Psyllium did not significantly affect blood pressure or levels of high-density cholesterol, triglycerides, serum glucose, or iron. Reported adherence to diet and treatment was excellent, and no significant adverse side effects were noted. These results indicate psyllium hydrophilic mucilloid is an effective and well-tolerated adjunct to diet in the management of mild to moderate hypercholesterolemia.

(JAMA. 1989;261:3419-3423)

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