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Article
September 15, 1989

Economic and Policy Implications of Early Intervention in HIV Disease

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Epidemiology and Social Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center/Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (Drs Arno and Shenson); Department of Health Policy and Administration, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (Ms Siegel); and the Institute for Health Policy Studies and Center for AIDS Prevention Studies, University of California, San Francisco (Ms Franks and Dr Lee).

From the Department of Epidemiology and Social Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center/Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (Drs Arno and Shenson); Department of Health Policy and Administration, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (Ms Siegel); and the Institute for Health Policy Studies and Center for AIDS Prevention Studies, University of California, San Francisco (Ms Franks and Dr Lee).

JAMA. 1989;262(11):1493-1498. doi:10.1001/jama.1989.03430110083033
Abstract

Early medical intervention in human immunodeficiency virus disease has farreaching implications for the health care system of the United States. Several factors are enabling the medical community to begin intervention prior to a patient's diagnosis of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. These factors include an understanding of the biologic markers of disease progression; advances in antiviral therapeutics; and an improved ability to control the most common presenting opportunistic infection, Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Providing adequate ambulatory care for large numbers of asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus—infected individuals and coordinating inner-city health care facilities will become critical. Important questions regarding service provision need to be adequately addressed. The cost of yearly treatment, estimated to be $5 billion per year, will require a major financial commitment at all levels of government and the private sector. Effective early intervention in human immunodeficiency virus disease may alter the course of one of the most devastating epidemics in modern history. Planning for its implementation should begin immediately.

(JAMA. 1989;262:1493-1498)

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