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Article
September 15, 1989

The 'Aging Game'An Approach to Education in Geriatrics

Author Affiliations

From the Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Durham, NC; Division of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Medicine, and Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development, Duke University Medical Center.

From the Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Durham, NC; Division of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Medicine, and Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development, Duke University Medical Center.

JAMA. 1989;262(11):1507-1509. doi:10.1001/jama.1989.03430110097036
Abstract

STRIKING demographic changes have occurred during this century with the increase in the number and proportion of elderly in the US population. With the improvement in life expectancy, however, the elderly are experiencing more of the cumulative effects of multiple chronic diseases and disability. The growing needs of the aged population require the availability of more physicians with an active interest and commitment to geriatric care. Yet, numerous reports have documented a widespread negative attitude held by those in the medical profession toward aging and the care of the elderly.1-10 Such biases may, in part, be due to the general societal negativity toward the aged and they may further reflect the traditional orientation of medical training, which emphasizes the management and cure of acute diseases to the neglect of a comprehensive approach to geriatrics/gerontology in medical school curricula.8

In an effort to sensitize medical students to the problems

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