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Article
September 22, 1989

The Epidemiology of Injuries in Atlanta Day-care Centers

Author Affiliations

From the Unintentional Injury Section, Epidemiology Branch, Division of Injury Epidemiology and Control, Center for Environmental Health and Injury Control (Drs Sacks and Sattin), and the Division of Field Services, Epidemiology Program Office (Dr Kaplan), Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, Ga; the Office of Epidemiology, Georgia Department of Human Resources, Atlanta (Mr Smith and Dr Sikes); and the Department of Health Policy and Management, Injury Prevention Center, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md (Ms Lambert).

From the Unintentional Injury Section, Epidemiology Branch, Division of Injury Epidemiology and Control, Center for Environmental Health and Injury Control (Drs Sacks and Sattin), and the Division of Field Services, Epidemiology Program Office (Dr Kaplan), Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, Ga; the Office of Epidemiology, Georgia Department of Human Resources, Atlanta (Mr Smith and Dr Sikes); and the Department of Health Policy and Management, Injury Prevention Center, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md (Ms Lambert).

JAMA. 1989;262(12):1641-1645. doi:10.1001/jama.1989.03430120095028
Abstract

From June 1987 through May 1988, we collected reports of injuries among 5300 children who attended 71 day-care centers in Atlanta, Ga. One hundred forty-three injuries severe enough for the child to require medical or dental care were reported, including 63 lacerations (44.1%), 23 fractures (16.1%), 5 crush injuries (3.5%), 4 dislocations (2.8%), 2 human bites (1.4%), and 2 concussions (1.4%). The head was the site of 98 (68.5%) injuries. Peak hours for injuries were 11 AM and 4 PM, the peak day was Monday, and the peak season was summer. After adjustment for hours and dates of attendance, the rate was 1.77 injuries per 100 000 child-hours in day care; among preschool-aged children, infants had the lowest rate (0.77) and 2-year-old children had the highest rate (2.26). Almost 47% of injuries occurred on the playground; falls were involved in 70% of such injuries. Because 33% of all injuries resulted from falls on the playground, impact-absorbing playground surfaces may be a possible intervention to reduce injuries.

(JAMA. 1989;262:1641-1645)

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