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Article
October 20, 1989

Measuring Compliance-Reply

Author Affiliations

Veterans Adminstration Medical Center West Haven, Conn Yale University School of Medicine New Haven, Conn

Veterans Adminstration Medical Center West Haven, Conn Yale University School of Medicine New Haven, Conn

JAMA. 1989;262(15):2092. doi:10.1001/jama.1989.03430150051019

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Abstract

In Reply.—  Mr Hoar has expressed concern about medication compliance in geriatric and retarded populations that were not addressed in our study. We observed medication-taking practices in adult patients with epilepsy (aged 18 through 68 years) of borderline to superior intelligence (IQ, 76 to 124) to assess compliance in a broad range of relatively normally functioning persons. Use by low-functioning patients is feasible, but has not been evaluated. The cost for Medication Event Monitoring Systems bottle rental ($7 per month) and a report ($56) is in the range of cost for a laboratory drug serum concentration test.As explained in the article, the Medication Event Monitoring Systems device counts "presumptive" doses. Indeed, this prototype device does not verify pill swallowing. The software developed by the Aprex Corporation (Fremont, Calif) to analyze Medication Event Monitoring Systems bottle data can filter excess, sequential openings. In addition, calendar plots showing missed doses and

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