[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 50.16.107.222. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
December 1, 1989

Randomized, Controlled Trial of Clonidine for Smoking Cessation in a Primary Care Setting

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Family Medicine, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY.

From the Department of Family Medicine, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY.

JAMA. 1989;262(21):3011-3013. doi:10.1001/jama.1989.03430210053029
Abstract

Clonidine hydrochloride has been reported to reduce tobacco withdrawal symptoms and facilitate smoking cessation. We enrolled 185 subjects, 92 receiving clonidine and 93 receiving placebo, in a randomized, double-blind study of clonidine for smoking cessation in a primary care setting. Clonidine had no demonstrable effect on withdrawal (8 of 11 measures favoring placebo). At 4 weeks, 17 (18%) subjects receiving clonidine had quit compared with 13 (14%) receiving placebo (χ2 = 0.7; 90% confidence interval of benefit from clonidine, —4% to 13%). At 4 weeks, the mean number of cigarettes smoked was 17.7 for those receiving clonidine and 17.5 for those receiving placebo (t=0.1; 90% confidence interval of benefit from clonidine, —4.1 to 3.7 cigarettes per day). These results provide little support for a beneficial effect of clonidine on tobacco withdrawal symptoms, quitting, or smoking reduction in a primary care setting.

(JAMA. 1989;262:3011-3013)

×