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Article
January 5, 1990

Non-A, Non-B Hepatitis and Antibody to Hepatitis C Virus

Author Affiliations

From the Transfusion-transmitted Viruses Study (TTVS) Group (Drs Mosley, Aach, Hollinger, and Stevens); the Division of Blood Diseases and Resources, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md (Drs Barbosa and Nemo): the TTVS—NHLBI Repository Use Committee (Drs Holland, Bancroft, and Zimmerman); and Chiron Corporation, Emeryville, Calif (Drs Kuo, Choo, and Houghton).

From the Transfusion-transmitted Viruses Study (TTVS) Group (Drs Mosley, Aach, Hollinger, and Stevens); the Division of Blood Diseases and Resources, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md (Drs Barbosa and Nemo): the TTVS—NHLBI Repository Use Committee (Drs Holland, Bancroft, and Zimmerman); and Chiron Corporation, Emeryville, Calif (Drs Kuo, Choo, and Houghton).

JAMA. 1990;263(1):77-78. doi:10.1001/jama.1990.03440010075034
Abstract

Stored serum samples from the Transfusion-transmitted Viruses Study in the 1970s were tested for the presence of antibody to hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV). Single specimens from five control subjects who did not receive transfusions tested negative for anti-HCV. Of four control subjects who did not receive transfusions and who developed non-A, non-B (NANB) hepatitis after hospitalization, three remained anti-HCV negative; the fourth person with postoperative NANB hepatitis tested anti-HCV positive before the operation. Five transfusion recipients with posttransfusion hepatitis B virus infection remained seronegative; a sixth with NANB hepatitis as well as hepatitis B virus infection had seroconversion for anti-HCV. Five of nine transfusion recipients with NANB hepatitis had anti-HCV seroconversion. These results show that present anti-HCV testing demonstrates an etiologic basis for approximately half of the cases of transfusion-associated NANB hepatitis, particularly those that develop chronicity. Although cases of NANB hepatitis without seroconversion may be explained otherwise, they may be caused by another, presently unidentified, virus.

(JAMA. 1990;263:77-78)

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