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Article
January 26, 1990

Medical Student AbuseIncidence, Severity, and Significance

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver.

From the Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver.

JAMA. 1990;263(4):527-532. doi:10.1001/jama.1990.03440040066030
Abstract

In a survey of the incidence, severity, and significance of medical student abuse as perceived by the student population of one major medical school, 46.4% of all respondents stated that they had been abused at some time while enrolled in medical school, with 80.6% of seniors reporting being abused by the senior year. More than two thirds (69.1%) of those abused reported that at least one of the episodes they experienced was of "major importance and very upsetting." Half (49.6%) of the students indicated that the most serious episode of abuse affected them adversely for a month or more; 16.2% said that it would "always affect them." Students identified various types of abuse and proposed a number of measures for the prevention and management of abuse in medical school. We conclude that medical student abuse was perceived by these students to be a significant cause of stress and should be a major concern of those involved with medical student education.

(JAMA. 1990;263:527-532)

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