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Article
January 26, 1990

Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT)Applications and Potential

Author Affiliations

From the Departments of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass.

From the Departments of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass.

JAMA. 1990;263(4):561-564. doi:10.1001/jama.1990.03440040100036
Abstract

Single-photon emission computed tomography has received increasing attention as radiopharmaceuticals that reflect perfusion, metabolism, and receptor and cellular function have become widely available. Perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography of the brain provides functional information useful for the diagnosis and management of stroke, dementia, and epilepsy. Single-photon emission computed tomography has been applied to myocardial, skeletal, hepatic, and tumor scintigraphy, resulting in increased diagnostic accuracy over planar imaging because background activity and overlapping tissues interfere far less with activity from the target structure when tomographic techniques are used. Single-photon emission computed tomography is substantially less expensive and far more accessible than positron emission tomography and will become an increasingly attractive alternative for transferring the positron emission tomography technology to routine clinical use. In addition, singlephoton emission computed tomography has unique applications that are increasingly finding their way into the routine practice of clinical nuclear medicine.

(JAMA. 1990;263:561-564)

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