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Article
December 3, 1982

The Clinical Professor

JAMA. 1982;248(21):2851-2852. doi:10.1001/jama.1982.03330210033030
Abstract

NOWHERE do I read of the rights or status, or even of the existence, of the clinical faculty. Having been a clinical professor for 15 years, I set down my own experience, which relates to appointments at several medical schools that shall remain nameless. I do it in writing because in my experience that is the only way that the clinical faculty can communicate with deans. I never met my deans, either before or while I was a clinical professor. Of course, my experience might be only a small, poor sample and not be representative of that of other readers who participate in clinical teaching.

What do I understand a "clinical" appointment to be? I consider it to be an action by a dean of a medical school that confers the right to teach and the right to use a title. Of course, the right to teach is a magnificent

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