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Article
February 9, 1990

End-Tidal Pco2 During Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

Author Affiliations

University of Health Sciences The Chicago Medical School North Chicago, Ill
St Vincent's Hospital and Medical Center of New York (NY)

University of Health Sciences The Chicago Medical School North Chicago, Ill
St Vincent's Hospital and Medical Center of New York (NY)

JAMA. 1990;263(6):814-815. doi:10.1001/jama.1990.03440060054029
Abstract

To the Editor.—  The contribution by Sanders et al1 strongly supports a series of earlier studies by our group, both experimental and clinical, on the rationale and hemodynamic significance of the end-tidal carbon dioxide tension (PETCO2) during cardiac arrest.2-4 Sanders and colleagues also deserve recognition for having initially observed a close relationship between PETCO2 and coronary perfusion pressure, an observation that we subsequently confirmed.5,6The importance of the PETCO2 measurement may, however, have been understated by the authors if it is viewed primarily as a prognostic indicator. In our own experience, it is the continuous measurement of PETCO2 and the extent to which the PETCO2 is moderated by therapeutic interventions that provides unique opportunities for therapeutic decision making. Yes, in the final analysis, the failure to achieve viable PETCO2

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