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Article
February 9, 1990

The Flowering of Plastic Surgery

Author Affiliations

Dr Cannon is clinical professor of surgery, emeritus, at Harvard Medical School and senior surgeon at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston.

Dr Cannon is clinical professor of surgery, emeritus, at Harvard Medical School and senior surgeon at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston.

JAMA. 1990;263(6):862-864. doi:10.1001/jama.1990.03440060108042
Abstract

PLASTIC surgery, unlike most surgical specialties, has no anatomic or functional area to which it can lay claim; the plastic surgeon practices methods and techniques applicable to all specialties and anatomic areas.

My first exposure to plastic surgery was as a medical student when I watched Varaztad H. Kazanjian, DMD, MD, reconstruct a nose with a forehead flap—the ancient Indian method. I was greatly intrigued. A decade later, I became his fast friend, admirer, and professional colleague, and, in 1941, succeeded him as chief of the Plastic Clinic at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), Boston.

Having spent my childhood in Cambridge, Mass, and 8 years of higher education at Harvard University, Cambridge, it seemed appropriate that I go elsewhere for my postgraduate training. When the opportunity arose to intern at Barnes Hospital in St Louis, Mo, I chose to leave Boston. (There was no matching plan in those days.) Quite

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