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Article
February 16, 1990

Rethinking the Presence of American Scholars in China

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Social Medicine, The University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill.

From the Department of Social Medicine, The University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill.

JAMA. 1990;263(7):992-993. doi:10.1001/jama.1990.03440070080037
Abstract

THE MASSACRE of Chinese students and citizens in Beijing last June shocked the world. Response was intensified by the almost instantaneous news coverage, which persisted until the Chinese government took control of the media. For Americans involved with research in China, the student uprising and the events in Tiananmen Square created tremendous pressure to articulate a position on China. As moral outrage turned to consideration of the long-term consequences of the events, a complex exchange among scholars, funding agencies, and government officials ensued.1 Many US organizations and individuals suspended research plans as the implications of continued involvement in China—moral, political, and interpersonal—were debated.

To some, June 4, 1989, marked a turning point in assessment of the Chinese regime. Cooperation and exchange that previously were acceptable now symbolized collaboration with a corrupt government. For me, the events that occurred in Tiananmen Square forced a reevaluation—not of current positions, but of

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