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Article
March 2, 1990

Home Care in the 1990s

Author Affiliations

From the Council on Scientific Affairs, American Medical Association, Chicago, III.; Dr Joanne Schwartzberg is medical director of Home Health Service of Chicago North, a not-for-profit home care agency, and is funded in part by a grant from Caremark Inc, an affiliate of Baxter Healthcare Corporation.

From the Council on Scientific Affairs, American Medical Association, Chicago, III.; Dr Joanne Schwartzberg is medical director of Home Health Service of Chicago North, a not-for-profit home care agency, and is funded in part by a grant from Caremark Inc, an affiliate of Baxter Healthcare Corporation.

JAMA. 1990;263(9):1241-1244. doi:10.1001/jama.1990.03440090075030
Abstract

Home care is a rapidly growing field that is beginning to attract greater physician interest and participation. Cost-containment pressures have led to reduced institutionalization in hospitals and nursing homes and to more patients, both acutely and chronically ill, being cared for in their own homes. Undergraduate and graduate medical education programs are developing home care curricula, and academic medicine is beginning to develop a research agenda, particularly in the area of clinical outcome measurements. Medical care in the home is highly diversified and innovative. The areas of preventive, diagnostic, therapeutic, rehabilitative, and long-term maintenance care are all well represented as physicians develop new practice patterns in home care.

(JAMA. 1990;263:1241-1244)

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