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Article
March 2, 1990

Cardiac Risk Classification Based on Lipid Screening

Author Affiliations

The Oregon Health Sciences University Portland; Veterans Affairs Medical Center Portland, Ore

The Oregon Health Sciences University Portland; Veterans Affairs Medical Center Portland, Ore

JAMA. 1990;263(9):1250-1252. doi:10.1001/jama.1990.03440090084032
Abstract

The National Cholesterol Education Program, a consortium of public and private groups created by the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md, has advised all Americans to "know your cholesterol number" so they can take steps to reduce their risk of coronary artery disease. The recommendations of the Adult Treatment Panel of the National Cholesterol Education Program is that total cholesterol levels of less than 5.17 mmol/L (200 mg/dL) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels of less than 3.36 mmol/L (130 mg/dL) are "desirable," while levels of 6.21 mmol/L (240 mg/dL) and 4.13 mmol/L (160 mg/dL) or more, respectively, are "high," carrying with them an increased risk of coronary artery disease.1 Values that fall between these two limiting values are considered to be "borderline-high."

Given the important role of cholesterol testing in the prevention and management of coronary heart disease, the National Cholesterol Education Program regards it as important that clinical

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