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Article
April 4, 1990

Long-term Follow-up of Health Care Workers With Work-Site Exposure to Human Immunodeficiency Virus

Author Affiliations

University of Minnesota AIDS Clinical Trials Group St Paul
Susan Pollack University of Minnesota Hospitals and Clinics Minneapolis
Shirley Kwok Cetus Corporation Emeryville, Calif

University of Minnesota AIDS Clinical Trials Group St Paul
Susan Pollack University of Minnesota Hospitals and Clinics Minneapolis
Shirley Kwok Cetus Corporation Emeryville, Calif

JAMA. 1990;263(13):1765-1766. doi:10.1001/jama.1990.03440130045016
Abstract

To the Editor.—  Recently, the issue of risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among health care workers has received heightened attention in both the lay and medical press, with an underlying theme of this renewed concern being a distrust of the current data (Newsweek. November 20, 1989:82-83).1Current Centers for Disease Control guidelines are predicated on the observed HIV seroconversion rate of 0.42% seen in studies of health care workers who suffer documented work-site exposure to HIV.2,3 Health care workers with exposure to body fluids of HIV-infected persons are frequently traumatized emotionally and may be advised to begin prophylaxis with zidovudine.4Data such as those reported by Imagawa et al5 and Haseltine6 raise the possibility that the false-negative rate of HIV serological testing might be significant in certain populations. Since the Centers for Disease Control recommendations regarding HIV exposure of health care workers were

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