[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.211.82.105. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
April 4, 1990

Skin Cancer Incidence: The Effects of Surveillance and Migration-Reply

Author Affiliations

Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research Portland, Ore
National Cancer Institute Bethesda, Md

Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research Portland, Ore
National Cancer Institute Bethesda, Md

JAMA. 1990;263(13):1767. doi:10.1001/jama.1990.03440130046021
Abstract

In Reply. —  Dr Stern raises some interesting points. Although the changes in "sun exposure habits" may have been gradual, the rises in incidence have been major. Indeed, sizable rises in melanoma rates in other registries antedate our study by several decades. In Connecticut, the incidence of melanoma (among males and females combined) rose from 1.0 per 100 000 to 3.6 per 100 000 in the 25 years between 1935 through 1939 and 1960 through 1964.1 Until this cancer became relatively common, such rises in incidence were ignored. Changes in incidence of squamous cell skin cancer went unreported, as data were not collected by registries.Interviews with clinicians who have been present over most of the study period revealed no changes in clinical practice with respect to management of skin lesions. However, we have no objective, quantifiable data to address this issue. Further, we note in the text that

×