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Article
April 18, 1990

Occupational Risk of Human Parvovirus B19 Infection for School and Day-care Personnel During an Outbreak of Erythema Infectiosum

Author Affiliations

From the Division of Viral Diseases, Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, Ga (Mss Gillespie and Tsou and Drs Asch, Gary, Hall, Anderson, and Hurwitz); the Connecticut State Department of Health Services, Hartford (Dr Cartter); and the Torrington (Conn) Area Health District (Mr Rokos). Ms Gillespie is now with the Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, Calif.

From the Division of Viral Diseases, Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, Ga (Mss Gillespie and Tsou and Drs Asch, Gary, Hall, Anderson, and Hurwitz); the Connecticut State Department of Health Services, Hartford (Dr Cartter); and the Torrington (Conn) Area Health District (Mr Rokos). Ms Gillespie is now with the Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, Calif.

JAMA. 1990;263(15):2061-2065. doi:10.1001/jama.1990.03440150069028
Abstract

Human parvovirus B19, the cause of erythema infectiosum, has recently been associated with adverse fetal outcomes. During a large outbreak of erythema infectiosum in Connecticut, a survey was conducted on 571 (90%) of 634 school and day-care personnel to determine the risk of acquiring B19 infection. Serologic evidence of B19 infection was determined by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Of the school and day-care personnel, 58% had evidence of previous B19 infection. The minimal rate of B19 infection in susceptible personnel during the outbreak was 19%. The risk was increased for teachers and daycare providers who had contact with younger children and with greater numbers of ill children. These results suggest that B19 infection is an occupational risk for school and day-care personnel.

(JAMA. 1990;263:2061-2065)

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