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Article
April 18, 1990

Informing Physicians About Promising New Treatments for Severe Illnesses

Author Affiliations

From the Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, Calif (Dr Steinbrook); and the Program in Medical Ethics, The Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program, the Center for AIDS Prevention Studies, and the Division of General Internal Medicine, University of California at San Francisco (Dr Lo).

From the Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, Calif (Dr Steinbrook); and the Program in Medical Ethics, The Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program, the Center for AIDS Prevention Studies, and the Division of General Internal Medicine, University of California at San Francisco (Dr Lo).

JAMA. 1990;263(15):2078-2082. doi:10.1001/jama.1990.03440150086031
Abstract

Physicians are increasingly informed of promising new treatments for severe illnesses through unconventional communications such as press releases, press conferences, and direct mailings. These highly publicized announcements disseminate information quickly, often many months before new data are presented at medical meetings or published in peer-reviewed medical journals. Such unconventional communications, however, usually do not provide sufficient detail for physicians to evaluate new studies, answer patients' questions, or make recommendations. We suggest that physicians would be better informed about therapeutic advances through (1) expanded information in unconventional communications, (2) increased availability of information from the Food and Drug Administration, (3) early submission and accelerated review of key medical journal articles, and (4) expanded use of on-line computerized information sources. A commitment to inform physicians better about promising new treatments may help save or prolong the lives of patients with severe illnesses.

(JAMA. 1990;263:2078-2082)

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