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Article
November 2, 1994

Bioethics in Washington: Yes, but How?

Author Affiliations

University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine Philadelphia
University of Virginia School of Medicine Charlottesville

JAMA. 1994;272(17):1323. doi:10.1001/jama.1994.03520170033016
Abstract

To the Editor.  —Bioethics has not had a permanent presence in Washington for more than a decade. This August, the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) called for the creation, by executive order, of a National Bioethics Advisory Commission in response to congressional interest and a report by the Office of Technology Assessment.The OSTP proposes that a standing advisory body be created within the executive branch to consider issues arising from "research on human biology and behavior and the applications of that research." The commission would offer advice and recommendations to the public about government programs, policies, and regulations related to research in human biology and behavior. It would also identify broad principles that should govern the ethical conduct of research. Among the kinds of issues the OSTP envisions the commission examining are the management and use of genetic information and the clarification of the concept of "minimal

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