[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
May 9, 1990

Polycythemia Vera

Author Affiliations

From the Hematology Division, Department of Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Md.

From the Hematology Division, Department of Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Md.

JAMA. 1990;263(18):2481-2483. doi:10.1001/jama.1990.03440180087038
Abstract

CASE PRESENTATION  —Peter White, Jr, MDA 64-YEAR-OLD retired truck driver was brought to The Johns Hopkins Hospital after a transient episode of unresponsiveness. Ten days before admission, when he entered another hospital for treatment of acute polyarticular gout, he appeared plethoric and had an enlarged spleen. The hematocrit was 0.71, red blood cell volume was 81 mL/kg (normal, 25 to 35 mL/kg), and plasma volume was 33 mL/kg (normal, 30 to 45 mL/kg). Bone marrow was hypercellular without fibrosis. He was treated for gout and polycythemia vera. Within a week 1200 mL of blood was withdrawn and he was discharged. On the following day, he was found to be unresponsive, with twitching movements of his hands and feet. The episode resolved within a few minutes, but he was promptly brought to the emergency department, where results of neurological examination and a cranial computed tomographic scan were normal.The patient

×